Kaffeklatsch

my native language is German – I publish a daily news letter at http://paper.li/frizztext/1341655486 – so I was amused as I noticed that many German words are understood in USA and other countries for example Kaffeeklatsch, Autobahn, Kindergarden, Wunderkind, Gemutlichkeit etc. – do you understand one of the following words too? Write a comment or a question: Kitsch – kaputt – Muesli – Sauerkraut – Alpenglow – kaffeklatsching – Edelweiss – Bratwurst – Gummibear – Nixe – Weltschmerz – Glockenspiel – Rollmops – Wanderlust – Lust – Angst – U-boat – zigzag – Schweinehund – Kinderfeindlichkeit – Landflucht – verboten -
threesome
photo by frizztext, click on the picture to enter his galleries on flickr. Write a comment or a question…
related:
http://www.langweiledich.net/2012/09/deutsche-worter-im-ausland/
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http://flickrcomments.wordpress.com/2012/03/19/germany-stereotypes/
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About frizztext

websites: 1 - my daily wordpress blog "flickrcomments" at FLICKRCOMMENTS, 2 - my own photos at frizztext, 3 - flickr group group: BLOG IT!

78 responses to “Kaffeklatsch

  1. Kitsch – kaputt – Muesli- Sauerkraut – these words are all commonly used in American English. So are Edelweiss – Bratwurst – verboten – Glockenspiel – – Wanderlust – Lust – Angst – U-boat – zigzag – Schweinehund – verboten –

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  2. Reblogged this on Ralphie´s Portal and commented:
    My favourite is: vollidioten bestendig!

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  3. ich verstehe einige – verboten, lust, autobahn, kindergarten, kaputt, sauerkraut, angst, Edelweiss, muesli, wanderlust

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  4. what a loverly picture
    but what discuss the pretty girls ?
    :-)) wolfgang

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  5. Mein Mr. Green bezog sich auf deine Antwort von deepa und ist leider an die falsche Stelle gesprungen.

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  6. “Das Boot” gefilmt in einem U-Boot, hat mich damals zutiefst beeindruckt und ich war heilfroh, dass mein Mann auf einem Zerstörer durch die Welt geschippert ist und nicht in einem U-Boot.
    Heute ist ein Tag, da muss ich meinen inneren Schweinehund überwinden, denn der Hund muss ja bewegt werden.
    Einen schönen Restsonntag mit viel Gemütlichkeit wünscht allen
    magdalena

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  7. Hi Frizz,.I do understand: kaffeeklatsch, kitsch, kaputt, autobahn, kindergarden, muesli, sauerkraut, Bratwurst, Verboten…And also I am able to say very politely, Eine .Wiessbier bitte,…Ja, Grosse bitte!!!

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  8. You are right! I knew almost all the words on your list and if anyone had asked me if I knew German I would have said, “Nein!”

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  9. What a cool sign! I assume it means cigarettes and cigars are ok, but not pipes!

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  10. I love your blog and your language! My father long since deceased was from Bavaria- I wish I had paid more attention when I was younger- was is it like a separate country please?

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    • Germany is a union of 16 states (Bundesländer) but Bavaria (very proud!) often considered to quit that construction to be an own state again (like 200 years before) like Switzerland or Austria … – they talk in a little different style in Bavaria too …

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  11. I love Bratwurst und Sauerkraut. :) I did learn German at school, but not having spoken it since, so unfortunately mein Deutsch ist etwas eingerostert. :(

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  12. once I wrote about stereotypes:

    http://flickrcomments.wordpress.com/2012/03/19/germany-stereotypes/

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    Die Deutschen
    title=”Die Deutschen” photo by giancarlo rado

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  13. I will not eat bratwurst, sauerkraut of rollmops – it is verboten!

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  14. Got all of them but 3 – probably because I’m a Heinz 57…

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    • yes Heinz or Fritz, Kurt or Karl, Gretel or Kunigunde are very German names!

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      • The joke in our house is that we have so many nationalities in our bloodline (English, scots, Irish, French, German, Prussian, polish, Mongolian, Spanish, First Nations – and that is only in the last 300 years) that we are like the old marketing campaign from Heinz ” 57 varieties” which has come to mean anything that is comprised or mixed from a lot of parts or origins… Much like your wonderful words! Wouldn’t mind being a Fritz or a Kunigunde though, they have bold personalities!

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  15. My hubby’s favorite German word – Bratwurst! ;-) Mine would be Springerli, then muesli. When we were first married, we lived next door to a couple about the age of our parents. The husband was American, the wife German, met during WW II. Oh, the wonderful food she would cook and share with us, not to mention an occasional bottle of German wine on New Year’s Eve.

    Thanks for visiting my blog and for following. May you have a good week ahead.

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  16. The german language is quite easy to understand – but to orientate in Germany is not easy – because when you are driving on one of the motorways in Germany then you find out that almost all cities are called “Ausfahrt” and the rest is called “Stau”… :-) ;-)

    – nur Spaß machen… :-) ;-)

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  17. How impressive that you have a daily news letter! I was not familiar with Kaffeklatsch. I looked it up and am glad I know it’s translation now. I used to park at “Heinz Field” or the Heinz plant when I worked (and lived) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). I have traveled to and worked in many countries, but as far as Germany I’ve only been to the Frankfurt airport or driven quickly through.
    My native language is English, but I should be fluent in Japanese (it’s a shame I am not), I know basics. I believe many people know “sushi, arigato, sayonara, sake, etc.) I should be fluent in Spanish since I took classes in high school, but I only remember basics.

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  18. wonderful how the german people generously spread their favourite words around the globe … i know most of them, but did not realise zigzag was german … thanks for that one, an essential!!!

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    • we spell zick zack and ambrose bierce explained: “To move forward uncertainly, from side to side, as one carrying (a big) burden” – like me, searching for a daily blog topic … maybe today I’ll write about a jukebox …
      P.S.:
      yesterday I saw a picture in the internet, introducing a donkey in Pakistan, who was fallen on his side: carrying a too large burden of stones on his back – sad…

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  19. I think you listed verboten twice. In this time of globalization, languages often melt together; especially in slang. Great post.

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  20. Kitsch – kaputt – Muesli – Sauerkraut – Alpenglow – Edelweiss (thanks to The Sound of Music) – Bratwurst – Gummibear – Glockenspiel – Wanderlust – Lust – Angst – U-boat – zigzag – verboten – …. and one of my favourite German words ever, uber!

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  21. So true about German words in the US–My favorite is Shadenfreude. Actually, it is not my favorite in terms of wanting to see the misfortune of others, but, instead, in the fact that this word exists in German that accurately describes a feeling very common in the USA.

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  22. This is a beautiful picture. Easier to remember for me are the food words.

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  23. Kindergarden (We have kindergardens in Mexico, I went to a kindergarden named “Jardín de niños del Pedregal” in Mexico City), Gummibear (a delicious fruity candy), muesli (there is a cereal which brand name is muesli, so I understand that muesli consists in a plate with oats, fruit and nuts), zigzag (we use it in Spanish language to describe a movement), I understand lust and angst because of my knowledge of English language, but we don´t use it in Spanish language

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  24. Kaffe and Kuchen [after] Kirche :-)
    It’s a funny thing in our house we always love to say … “It’s Freitag !!!! ” announcing the joy of thinking about the weekend ahead ;-)

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  25. oops dropped in ‘i’ christkindlmarkt

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  26. Pingback: Someone’s always complaining | blueberriejournal

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