A Question And Feedbacks

On the topic QUESTIONS I daily remember the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889 – 1951) who said: “One can easily imagine a language consisting only of orders and messages in battle, or a language consisting only of questions and an expression of affirmation and negation. And countless others. To imagine a language means to imagine a life form.“
Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit, Stealth Bomber, AV-10 - 88-0331 "Spirit of South Carolina" at KBAD Barksdale Defenders of Liberty Airshow
title=”Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit, Stealth Bomber, AV-10 – 88-0331 “Spirit of South Carolina” at KBAD Barksdale Defenders of Liberty Airshow” – photo by AV8PIX Christopher Ebdon, click on the picture to enter his galleries on Flickr
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Messerschmitt  Me262 B-1C Swallow N262AZ Collins Foundation c
title=”Messerschmitt Me262 B-1C Swallow” N262AZ Collins Foundation – photo uploaded by Bill Word, click on the picture to enter his galleries on Flickr
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http://chewingwords.wordpress.com/ answered: “I like Wittgenstein’s quote. A lot. At a dinner party, I was seated next to an army general. I asked him about the command, “Ready. Aim. Fire.” I was getting a tad philosophical, but I was interested in the underlying principle of the command; not just that one is firing a gun. But the trifold nature of the command is what intrigued me. He explained to me that commands in the (American) military are a deliberate sequence, with each part having a specific function. “Ready” – get yourself in position. “Aim” – prepare yourself for what you need to do. “Fire” – execute the command. I found this a fascinating revelation. I’d forgotten about that until reading this quote. I think you’ve just helped me for one of my 365 entries for PostADay!”
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http://jasonrosa.wordpress.com/ answered: “Mr. ‘Frizz’, on your article, Airshow Triumph, you mentioned the sadness involved with aviation used for military purposes. I agree. Being young, I am sometimes naive to the pain and destruction war -especially these aircraft- cause. They are powerful, swift, maneuverable and in some ways majestic; still sometimes I do ponder and reflect, sometimes a little regretful in my awe for military aircraft. Though they may have a horrible bite, there is a bit of “majestic-ness” military aircraft have that I cannot escape, nor do I want to. I do, repeatably agree and think that it would be much better if these aircraft could be enjoyed solely for their aesthetic / photographic qualities and their excellent aerobatic / avionic performance.
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http://tostir.wordpress.com/ answered: “My father’s jet had a triangle with the word DANGER inside just below his cockpit, and the squadron insignia – a viscious-looking wolf. He helped me build a model of an F4. A conflicting thing as a child, to hate something so deeply and want desperately for my father to come home alive. It was difficult to understand what peace was, even the protesters angry, warring to a car full of kids and a terrified mother trying to drive on the military base. I became a pacifist early on. And now I’m co-existing with a wolf pack living where I do. I like that very much. Thanks for your wise words. As for the 1st poster — If I remember right I think it was a hand-me-down from my sister – Janis Joplin!”
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P.S. by frizztext:
In Germany, short after World War II and during the fifties some publishers sold penny novels for the youth, telling stories from war “heroes”: doing their killing jobs in tanks, in submarines or in airplanes (like Walter Nowotny in his Me 262). Of course the allies disagreed after a while and those print messages were strictly forbidden. O.K. – but I cannot notice, that in the USA has been a similar process of critical questioning…
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related:
https://flickrcomments.wordpress.com/2013/04/07/decade-of-war/
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http://hughcurtler.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/congress-and-the-drones/
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https://flickrcomments.wordpress.com/2013/03/28/airshow-triumphs/
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https://flickrcomments.wordpress.com/2011/09/19/your-first-poster-on-the-wall/
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