The Art of Snark: Creative Disagreement

frizztext: Swift or Monty Python: in UK to criticize is not a capital crime – but it seems to be so in the USA with those overwhelming “political correctness” rules and the duty to optimism?

The Daily Post

Did you know that, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, the origin of the word snark lies in the snorting sound people made — already in the nineteenth century! — when they wanted to dismiss or ridicule another person? These days, others might not be able to hear us as we roll our eyes in disbelief at their opinions (when eyes roll in front of a laptop, do they make a sound?). We’ve become masters, however, at making the silent, verbal equivalent of eye-rolling: a quick, snide comment on a blog post, a disapproving cat in a hastily-phrased meme. Is the art of creative disagreement a thing of the past?

A quick, snide comment on a blog post, a disapproving cat in a hastily phrased meme: is the art of creative disagreement a thing of the past?

Not quite. We read hundreds of your posts every week, from Writing…

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About frizztext

writer, photographer, guitarist

11 responses to “The Art of Snark: Creative Disagreement

  1. Jonathan Swift or Monty Python,
    George Bernhard Shaw or Curchill,
    Oscar Wilde or Robin Hood:
    +
    in UK to criticize is not a capital crime –
    ~
    but it seems to be so in the USA
    with those overwhelming
    “political correctness” rules
    and the duty to optimism?

    Like

  2. vastlycurious.com

    Very creative approach !

    Like

  3. carrico

    I must admit the ‘duty to optimism’ throws me a bit. Could you elaborate? Is this like, ‘Shit happens’? Or is it something about whether or not to place a question mark inside the bloody quote?

    Like

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