Brighton Beach – Little Odessa

visiting New York, we were amused to find in Brighton Beach / Coney Island a concentrated Russian neighborhood (“Little Odessa”): Russian book stores, bars (Rasputin Restaurant), shops, churches – even the beach life was presenting the energy of this community!
Brighton Beach Baptism 12
title=”Brighton Beach Baptism 12″ – photo by RR’s (Russ Rowland, New York) Snap Shop, click on the picture to enter his galleries on Flickr
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recently I was excited, when the New York times presented the photographer Emine Ziyatdinova (Magnum Foundation) with a perfect photo reportage about the same topic: http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/23/brighton-beach-bittersweet/?smid=tw-share “… images, which are by turns melancholy, absurd and funny…”

About frizztext

websites: 1 - my wordpress blog "flickrcomments" at FLICKRCOMMENTS, 2 - my photos at frizztext, 3 - my guitar exercises fingerstyle_guitar, 4 - my museum-series The MUSEUM SERIES

16 responses to “Brighton Beach – Little Odessa

  1. Love the photo… and the shared memory. ;-)

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  2. Every time I go to Brighton Beach I come back with a hangover just from watching the Russian diners drink!

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  3. Very interesting post – never been to Brighton Beach – but I really enjoy visiting ethnic neighborhoods in large cities that I visit – In my eyes there are many positive aspects of these neighborhoods – for example here in Europe is London the rich on opportunities for experiences – Earls Court (australian) – China Town (chinese) – Brixton (afro-caribbean especially Jamaica ) – Golders Green (jewish) – Hackney (vietnamese) – Haringey (turkish, kurdish, cypriot) – Kilburn (irish) – Tooting (indian, pakistani, Bangladesh plus former african colonies) – Notting Hill (afro-caribbean) – Neasden (Little India) and so on… :-)

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  4. That link was very interesting. Thanks, ft. I’ve never been to Brighton Beach, but it looks like there’s a lot of fun going on there. :)

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  5. I am always amazed at how the demographic of a neighbourhood changes over time (and sometimes not…) – I can’t count the languages around here but apart from English (and French,of course) Russian, Polish, German, Yiddish, Phillipine and Vietnamese would be the top 6 – like a little UN without the bickering and indecision…

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  6. It sounds very fun.

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  7. ..meravigliose!!!
    Ciao Friz!!!
    vento

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  8. How very colorful in all aspects. :-)

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  9. wow…………….

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  10. Wolfgang Hermann

    die globalisierung ist nicht aufzuhalten

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