Unjust



Giordano Bruno

Originally uploaded by Frizztext

At http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=unjust you can read, what that is: UNJUST. The philosopher Giordano Bruno could feel that: There was an unjust accusation against him by the Catholic Church. With bitter consequences: On 17 February 1600 he publicly was burned on the Campo di Fiori in Rome after eight years torture and dungeon detention. The photo of his sculpture, which I made in Rome, was also the cover of my book about “The persistence of the philosophers”. That was 1600. Forget it! you could say. Too far away. O.K. – But I’m convinced everyone nowadays has some other examples for that word, UNJUST, isn’t it?

Curious, on the other hand: Hosi Mubarak, president in Egypt, thinks, he is an example too for an unjust accusation. The same trouble, which we had with Saddam Hussein or Nicolae Ceaucescu, with Margot and Erich Honecker, Hitler and Stalin. And not to mention the evil ones of history: in your very neighborhood, I am sure, you know further examples 🙂
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About frizztext

writer, photographer, guitarist

12 responses to “Unjust

  1. The inquisition is alive in a modern format, no? Beautiful photography!

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  3. postadaychallenge2011

    Thank you for the link and the word “unjust.” My battle will probably be written in a book, and it inspired me to become a Paralegal. If I won the lottery I would go to John Marshall Law School in Chicago, IL. It is not just me that I feel “unjust” things have happened in the legal realm of this world. It is the “innocent” that need help and support. The legal system is so complex and I wish to help others in their legal battles or even with encouragement, despite my own battle with Child Support.

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