Story Challenge: Letter “C”

Hi Bloggers! Do you have to share a story or a short reflection tagged with the letter “C”? For example I’ve written about CHILDHOOD and CHERNOBYL, CATS and CHATS, CIRCLES and CHALLENGES, CRUISESHIPS and CAPTAINS, CELEBRATIONS and CUCKOO CLOCKS, CAPPUCCINO or CAPPADOCCIA, CRUELTY and CHINA, CENSORSHIP and CAMOUFLAGE, CITIES and CUCUMBERS, CHANGES and CONTACTS, CRISTIANITY or CARTOONS, COFFINS and COLORS, COCA COLA and CASTLES, CHARACTER or CONCENTRATION, CONTRASTS and CULTURES, CARNIVAL or CARS, CELIBACY or CURIOSITY, CORMORANTS and COURAGE, CINEMAS or CATHEDRALS, COLOGNE or CALCUTTA, CAFÉS and COMMUNITIES – I’m sure you’ll find an own story or a short reflection tagged with “C”! Feel free to add in the comments the link to your personal interpretation of the letter “C”!!!

CHILDHOOD

A Look of Warning
photo by just jb / Joan Barrett; title=”A Look of Warning”
- click on the picture to enter her flickr galleries

my “C” story / reflection / short comment tagged with “C”:

Not every childhood is filled with love and happiness. Sometimes it can be a nightmare. Abuse. Absurd corporal punishment rites. Because I had such a childhood, I am interested, if artists create compositions, which can be bridges of understanding and empathy leading into such a dark world…
P.S.
Born 1945 I was immediately given into an orphanage. Adopted three years later I did not enter a paradise. My ex-Nazi father liked to repeat and practice physical punishment rites (every evening 7 p.m.) – similar those he had seen in the concentration camps of the world war II. Additional I usually was locked in the night in the basement where it was dark. Similar locked doors metaphorically I had to discover getting overwhelmed by youth gangs, religious groups, inhuman military discipline etc. – it was a long way into liberty fenced in the post-war Nazi German society. I have to thank for support: my wife Barbara and some friends and teachers. Of course I tried not to hurt my own children in the same way. I tried to change the principles of education radically…
Recently I was surprised, looking at the wikipedia map, in how many countries it is still allowed to beat children. Germany and Spain after all those years of Fascism did learn. Scandinavia seems to be a paradise – but what is happening in many other countries?
1953 - storytelling
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feedbacks at http://flickrcomments.wordpress.com/2011/10/06/black-childhood/:
1 – for example Teresa answered there:
Thank you for being brave enough to write about such a sensitive subject. I’m so sorry that you had to struggle through such a horrific childhood. Just because it’s quick, cheap and deters unruliness in the short run, I do not think that corporal punishment should be used on small children. There are more ethical ways to discipline children: time outs in a designated, safe spot; withholding privileges; praise and rewards for good behavior; etc.). Albeit they take a little more time and effort, but I think they are worth it. According to Wikipedia, “The American Psychological Association opposes the use of corporal punishment in schools, juvenile facilities, child care nurseries, and all other institutions, public or private, where children are cared for or educated. It claims that corporal punishment is violent and unnecessary, may lower self-esteem, and is liable to instill hostility and rage without reducing the undesired behavior. The APA also states that corporal punishment is likely to train children to use physical violence.” Kudos for not using physical violence to discipline your children FrizzText. Congratulations on breaking the cycle of child abuse that could have occurred!

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2 – Myra GB (read in the comments below) replied:
One of the earliest research studies I was privileged enough to be a part of was documenting stories of children survivors of various forms of abuse: physical, sexual, prostituted children, street kids or those engaged in child labor – and many others. I was a fresh psych undergraduate at the time and was working on my PhD program in clinical psych. Nothing prepared me for the horrific stories I heard. Yet despite all that, I was moved by the amazing resilience of the children and how they managed to go past their pain and transcend it. Some don’t, but most do. I am glad that you have gone beyond your own personal pain and are able to see it from another perspective – one that is still filled with questions and anguish, but filled with wisdom as well from the experience.
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the positive version of childhood:
Saturday Morning
title=”Saturday Morning” – photo by -will wilson- San Francisco
related:
The “C” Archive + The “C” Challenge + Childhood Flashbacks + Chernobyl + Cappadoccia
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About frizztext

websites: 1 - my daily wordpress blog "flickrcomments" at FLICKRCOMMENTS, 2 - photo pool at frizztext, 3 - flickr group BLOG IT!, 4 - twitter, 5 - my guitar, 6 - about.me

84 responses to “Story Challenge: Letter “C”

  1. i am sorry you had to suffer through this crime of punishment as a child. i am appalled at how some countries still allow this to go on

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  2. Pingback: Photo Journal / Photo Challenge: C is for Cirque de Soleil «

  3. One of the earliest research studies I was privileged enough to be a part of was documenting stories of children survivors of various forms of abuse: physical, sexual, prostituted children, street kids or those engaged in child labor – and many others. I was a fresh psych undergraduate at the time and was working on my PhD program in clinical psych. Nothing prepared me for the horrific stories I heard. Yet despite all that, I was moved by the amazing resilience of the children and how they managed to go past their pain and transcend it. Some don’t, but most do. I am glad that you have gone beyond your own personal pain and are able to see it from another perspective – one that is still filled with questions and anguish, but filled with wisdom as well from the experience. Thank you for sharing with us your childhood story, Frizz.

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    • thank you, Myra, for your elaborated reply! I’m for example glad to hear,
      that you were
      “…moved by the amazing resilience of the children
      and how they managed to go past their pain
      and transcend it.
      Some don’t, but most do…”

      Like this

    • hello Myra,
      thank you for your kind comment on childhood and resilience
      - and the BEATLES quotation:
      +
      “There’s nothing you can do
      that can’t be done.
      Nothing you can sing
      that can’t be sung.
      Nothing you can say
      but you can learn how to play
      the game. It’s easy.”

      Like this

  4. people want to encourage and not discourage children

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  5. Pingback: Story Challenge: Letter “C” « Flickr Comments by FrizzText | A-Z ARCHIVE : NELLIBELL49 ON THE BELLINGER RIVER IN 2012

    • hi Ineke,
      thank you for your heart touching life fragment
      “Before I left home after living 4 years with my parents,
      my parents asked me to come into their bedroom and sit on the bed.
      They both told me they are giving me this precious
      CAMEO which belonged to my grandmother
      …I was really speechless when they gave it to me…”

      Like this

  6. Such a difficult post to have written. You survived, and that speaks volumes about your resiliency. Your wife sounds like a wonderful woman to have helped you through this.

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  7. Dear frizz what a brave post. I am sorry you had such a bad time, somehow through it all you have turned into a wonderful human being that brings joy to so many.

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  8. I’m really moved and sorry to hear about your traumatic childhood. I’ve known a few who also had an unpleasant childhood(though not as bad as yours) and have come out it quite successfuly (but we who know them well can see the scars deep below) .

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  9. What a traumatic childhood you had–my heart goes out to you. I am glad you survived it, and found supportive people in your life. I have never raised a hand to my children. A parent who hits or spanks a child is teaching that child it’s okay to use violence against if you are bigger and stronger, or if you tell them it’s for their own good. But it is never okay to hurt a child, and patience, kindness, setting a good example is the way to show children right from wrong. The word “discipline” is from the same root word as disciple, and it means “to teach.” But it has come to mean punishment as well, which is very, very sad. But I’m guessing that you were merely an outlet for your adopted father’s anger.

    Here is a post from the archives about a very nasty teacher I had–the only time I was ever been publicly punished in school.

    http://naomibaltuck.wordpress.com/2012/01/05/remembering-fort-detroit/#comment-2557

    Like this

  10. Here’s what I wrote about strange cabbages in Portugal: http://juliedawnfox.com/2012/01/14/c-is-for-cabbages/

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  11. Amy

    A sobbing, painful… story, it takes courage to tell the story.

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  12. Interesting image above that leaves it to the imagination about the trip. My try at C: http://bellechance.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/c-is-for-carved/

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  13. Pingback: “C” is for Children and Coffe | a hectic life

  14. Childhood is best. The others are “cocomino”, “car”, “Coca cola” and “ica-Cold drink.”

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  15. Pingback: C! Challenge: Cannon « beyondpaisley

  16. Here’s my C-challenge this week. Though in reading my fellow posters’ challenges, I’ve realized a few other things I could have posted. Ah, well…26 weeks from now…. :) Anyway. Here’s my challenge, about the tiniest and most adorable working cannon I’ve ever seen. http://beyondpaisley.net/2012/07/17/c-challenge-cannon/

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  17. Pingback: C is for Carved « Belle Chance

  18. Pingback: Story Challenge: Letter C « Incidentally

  19. Pingback: STORY CHALLENGE: LETTER “C” « Francine In Retirement

  20. I find your your early childhood very unfortunate and sad and I am glad to see you have become a better and successful man with very creative talents. Your story brought back a memory for me, although not anything like yours, but just a forgotten one. Here is my Story Challenge: Letter “C” – City Chickens & A Corn Field. http://wp.me/p23TG1-11I

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

    Like this

  21. Frizz, the man you are today (so talented, intuitive, loving, supportive, wise–and,and,and (I could go on forever1) just goes to show that an awful childhood does NOT doom a person to have an awful life! Bless you for your openness here today!

    Like this

  22. Pingback: Story Challenge: Letter “C” « Rois

  23. I am so sorry you had such a traumathic childhood. Hugs from me.

    Mine – http://jullianeford.wordpress.com/2012/07/18/story-challenge-letter-c/

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  24. Morning frizztext. For the C section of my Bellingen Valley A-Z, I have chosen CAFES. We are in a verdant valley, mostly rural but we surely do have cafes. http://abcnellibell49.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/cc-is-for-cafes/

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  25. Pingback: STORY CHALLENGE: LETTER “C” | The World Is a Book…

  26. Pingback: “C” Challenge: Combative, Confrontational | Creativity Aroused

  27. Such a tragic childhood. Your survival story is admirable!
    Here is my entry:
    http://creativityaroused.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/c-challenge-combative-confrontational/

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    • thank you for your political statement:
      “how tragic to spend all day in confrontation. It would be nice if there could be more sharing, and less greed and fighting…by all species…”
      frizz: actually: in Syria

      Like this

  28. It’s sad to think that this still happens, as we in the States are seeing in the Penn State trial recently.

    Here’s my story – how our cats gave up their house rule to our son:

    http://www.sofacents.com/whos-in-charge-here/

    Like this

    • I enjoyed to read every single word of your charming story about cat behaviour; not only because we have a cat – and three grandsons: I adore your empathy – how you understand that the boss cat wants to have the seat on the top level of the cat post – and that your baby on the other hand likes to reach the ceiling! a very amusing fragment of your family live – with a perfect photo document!

      Like this

  29. Hello FrizzText and all you fellow A-Z Challengers! Here’s my take on this week’s C Challenge: http://stephenkellycreative.wordpress.com/2012/07/18/a-z-challenge-the-letter-c-coit-tower/

    Like this

  30. Pingback: story challenge: letter c! (cathy) « a nomad in the land of nizwa

  31. Hi Frizz, that is such a sad and horrible story about your childhood. I can’t imagine how horrible it must have been for you. I’m so sorry. But yet. Look at you now. You are a great person and a great photographer and writer, so maybe the hardship made you a strong and interesting person. Thanks to all the support you get from your wife and family. Somehow, the universe takes care of us if only we will let it. Thanks for sharing.

    Mine is a very ridiculous post this time: http://catbirdinoman.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/story-challenge-letter-c-cathy-2/

    Not nearly so revealing and open as yours.

    Thanks again for an interesting challenge. ~ Cathy

    Like this

    • hi Cathy,
      you wrote: “Catherine the Great, Katherine Hepburn, Katherine Heigl, Catherine Deneuve, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Catherine de Medici (royalty!). Just look at all the famous Catherines!! But when I look up the “famous” Cathys, I don’t recognize a single one…”
      +
      my first thought was “Cathy’s Clown” by the Everly Brothers!

      Like this

  32. Childhood shadows are indeed long, informing our every step into the wider world. The man who kicks his own is a man to be feared by all. That your past has evolved from such darkness to where you are now is testament to the inherent goodness in you.

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  33. Wonderfu, Frizztextl! I like the theme “childhood”: “it’s our upper room!

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  34. Here is a “C” post from my archives. :-) http://mywordwall.wordpress.com/2012/04/20/130/

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  35. Pingback: FAVORITE(ST) CHOCOLATES EVER! « mywordwall

  36. CONTROL
    by le drake noir:
    http://ledrakenoir.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/c-for-control/
    = “Many things that were previously allowed are now forbidden…”
    frizz-comment: – it soothes me, that this is not only in my country but in Denmark too. Only the insects do not care …

    Like this

  37. Childhood is perfect for “C”, likes your post… ;-)

    My “C”… ;-)
    http://ledrakenoir.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/c-for-control/

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    • CONTROL = “Many things that were previously allowed are now forbidden…”
      – it soothes me, that this is not only in my country but in Denmark too.
      Only the insects do not care …

      Like this

  38. I am so sorry you had a sad childhood Frizz, but like I said before, I am glad it had a happy ending. Take care. Will submit my entry soon.

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  39. Pingback: The City I Call Home « The Urge To Wander

  40. I always find it at odds with my thoughts when I click ‘like’ on posts such as this – A very sad subject told with the benefit of experience. In the Uk it’s illegal to beat children although the law has been clarified to allow parents to ‘smack’ children. Locking a child in a cellar at night would definitely bring down the full weight of the law and the social services upon the parent if they became aware of such abuse.

    My C response tackles no important subjects, just another look into the weird world of Amateur Radio…

    http://2e0mca.wordpress.com/2012/07/23/a-z-story-challenge-c-is-for-cq-concorso/

    Like this

    • hi Martin in U.K.,
      oh, once I built those little morse and radio machines …
      - thanks for your bridge to my memories –
      P.S.:
      and thanks for your interesting comment about
      “Locking a child in a cellar at night…”
      - my daily childhood experience for many years …
      in the next morning they used to laugh about me
      because my face was black by the coals I had to sleep in;
      sometimes I screamed very loud;
      the neighbours started to make some trouble;
      so the man who adopted me did not stop his behaviour vs. me
      - I was only a child from an orphanage -
      he put me in the cellar of a bureau-house, empty at night, with steel doors;
      kind of comfortable, because there was a heating
      no more cold nights at least …
      +
      after years the neighbors told my fate to the police;
      then the couple who adopted me left the town
      and rented an apartement in a little town 100 miles away.
      I was aged ten now; they stopped to put me in the basement at night,
      but continued to beat me till I was twenty;
      I never managed to stop this;
      when I earned my first own money (aged 24)
      I left them (without a word) and never came back …
      +
      always when I have a flashback to my childhood and this man,
      a song in my heart tries to soothe my soul:
      JOSH WHITE, singing the old gospel:
      THERE’s a man man, going round,
      taking names
      (and he took my name. My name was Klingbeil and he made me to Fritze)

      Like this

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